Journal Express, Knoxville, IA

Breaking News

April 18, 2013

Public Health still without communications

(Continued)

Knoxville —

• Tumble dry in a dryer or hang items to dry in the sun. 
 
3. Large items that are porous such as patio upholstered furniture, mattresses wall to wall carpeting, etc., that have been soaked by flood waters MUST be discarded. 
4. To clean items that are solid (will not absorb water) such as a concrete, tile or vinyl flooring, plastic patio furniture, plastic toys, picture frames, etc. use a mild household detergent solution to clean the item. 
5. To disinfect solid items (after cleaning), make a mild bleach and water solution (1/4 cup of bleach to one gallon of water). Use the solution in one of these ways: 
• Immerse small objects in the bleach/water solution for one minute. Remove from the solution and allow to air dry. 
• Spritz/spray the bleach/water solution with a spray bottle or deck sprayer on the item until thoroughly wet and allow to air dry. 
• Use a cloth dipped in the bleach/water solution to completely wipe the item down and allow to air dry. 
 
 
If in DOUBT, throw it OUT!

 

Flooded Private Sewage Systems
SAFETY, SANITATION AND CLEAN-UP CONCERNS
 
Flooding of a private sewage system can be a hazardous situation for homeowners. It may lead to a back-up of sewage in the home, contaminated drinking water and lack of sanitation until the system is fixed. While you don't have control over rainfall or flooding in your area, you can prepare for high water problems and respond appropriately to emergency flooding.
HOW PROBLEMS OCCUR
When flooding or saturated soil conditions persist, a private sewage system cannot function properly.
Soil treatment systems for wastewater rely on aerobic (with oxygen) regions to reduce the amounts of chemicals and living organisms (viruses, bacteria and protozoa). When the soil is saturated or flooded, those hazardous materials can enter the groundwater and your drinking water supply.
PREPARING FOR FLOODING
If you are prepared when flooding occurs, your family can be safe and your system should survive. To prepare for a flood you should:
Make sure all septic tanks are full of liquid. The high-water season is not the time to have tanks pumped; empty tanks are buoyant and may "pop" out of the ground during flooding. 
Plug floor drains, if necessary, to keep sewage from backing up into the basement. Floodwaters may still enter the basement through cracks and seams, however. 
DURING A FLOOD
Discontinue use of your private sewage system. Use portable toilets, if possible, or use any large container with a tight-fitting lid for a temporary toilet. Line the container with a plastic bag. After each use, add chlorine bleach or disinfectant to stop odor and kill germs. If necessary, bury wastes on high ground far away from your well. 
Remember that a well may become contaminated during a flood. Therefore, DO NOT DRINK THE WATER. Drink bottled water, or disinfect water before drinking. Contact your local health department for disinfection instructions. 
Do not bathe or swim in floodwater. It may contain harmful organisms. 
Shut off power to a sewage lift pump if you have one in the house or in a pump chamber (mound, in-ground pressure, at-grade systems). 
AFTER THE FLOOD
Do not use the sewage system until water in the disposal field is lower than the water level around the house. 
If you suspect damage to your septic tank, have it professionally inspected and serviced. Signs of damage include settling or inability to accept water. Most septic tanks are not damaged by a flood since they are below ground and completely covered. However, sometimes septic tanks or pump chambers become filled with silt and debris, and must be professionally cleaned. If tile lines in the disposal field are filled with silt, a new system may have to be installed in new trenches. Because septic tanks may contain dangerous gases, only trained specialists should clean or repair them. 
Discard any items that are damaged by contaminated water and cannot be steam cleaned or adequately cleaned and disinfected. 
Do not pump water out of basements too quickly. Exterior water pressure could collapse the walls. 
If sewage has backed up into the basement, clean the area and disinfect the floor with a chlorine solution of one-half cup of chlorine bleach to 1 gallon of water. 
 

 

Text Only
Breaking News
Features
AP Video
Virginia Governor Tours Tornado Aftermath Kerry: No Deal Yet on 7-Day Gaza Truce Kangaroo Goes Missing in Oklahoma Judge Faces Heat Over Offer to Help Migrant Kids Raw: Deadly Tornado Hits Virginia Campground Ohio State Marching Band Chief Fired After Probe Raw: Big Rig Stuck in Illinois Swamp Obama Advisor Skips House Hearing Power to Be Restored After Wash. Wildfire Dempsey: Putin May Light Fire and Lose Control In Case of Fire, Oxygen Masks for Pets Mobile App Gives Tour of Battle of Atlanta Sites Anti-violence Advocate Killed, but Not Silenced. Arizona Prison Chief: Execution Wasn't Botched Calif. Police Investigate Peacock Shooting Death Police: Doctor Who Shot Gunman 'Saved Lives' MN Twins Debut Beer Vending Machine DA: Pa. Doctor Fired Back at Hospital Gunman Raw: Iowa Police Dash Cam Shows Wild Chase Obama Seeks Limits on US Company Mergers Abroad
Facebook
Hyperlocal Search
Premier Guide
Find a business

Walking Fingers
Maps, Menus, Store hours, Coupons, and more...
Premier Guide
Poll

Upon completion and reopening of Third Street, should the City of Knoxville wait to start the next stage of the Streetscape and Infrastructure project until 2015?

Yes
No
     View Results